Glossary of Deities
Aengus Óg
Irish. God of youth, love, and inspiration.
Agni
“Fire". Vedic. God of fire, priest of the gods, intermediary between us and the gods.
Airmed
Irish. Goddess of healing, especially with herbs.
Airyamen
“The People". Vedic. God of society, healing, and marriage; of bringing things together happily.
Amaterasu
Japanese. Sun goddess.
Apam Napat
“Close Relative of the Waters". God of fire hidden in water; often identified with Agni.
Aphrodite
Greek. The Greeks translated her name as “foam born", but it probably has its origin in “Ashtorerth”, the name of the Phoenician version of Astarte. Goddess of love, beauty, and passion.
Apollo
Greek and Roman. God of healing, truth, civilization, music, and the sun.
Ares
“Strife". Greek. God of war.
Ariomanus
Roman. A god in Mithraism depicted with a lion's head and wings. He likely was a god of fire who served to purify the soul on its journey toward the celestial realm.
Artemis
Greek. Goddess of the wild, the hunt, virginity, and the moon.
Asklepios
Greek (in Rome, he was called “Aesculapius”). God of healing.
Athena
“Of Athens". Greek. Goddess of wisdom, communication, and the practical arts; also of politics and protection. Equivalent to the Roman Minerva.
Aushrine
“Rising". Lithuanian. Goddess of the dawn and spring.
Brighid
“Exalted". Irish. Hearth goddess, mothering goddess. As patron of poets, smiths, and healers, she is also a goddess of inspiration.
Castor and Pollux
Greek and Roman. Twin gods, protectors, especially of sailors and soldiers. Patrons of cattle and horse ranchers.
Ceres
“Grower". Roman. Goddess of growing things, especially grain, and of prosperity.
Cernunnos
“Antlered One". Gaulish. The one who goes between opposites; god of prosperity, especially that acquired through trade.
Cybele
Phrygian. Mother goddess.
Dionysos
Greek. God of wine, the vine, and ecstasy.
Domovoi
Russian. House guardian who lives behind the stove.
Dyèus Ptèr
“Shining Sky Father". Proto-Indo-European. Chief god, dispenser of wisdom and justice, enforcer of the natural order of things.
Eos
“Rising". Greek. Goddess of the spring and dawn.
Eostre
“Rising". Germanic. Goddess of the spring and dawn.
Firebird
Russian. A bird that dwells in a faraway land, guarding the Tree of Life. It may bring blessings or disaster on those who encounter it.
Freyr
“Lord". Norse. God of friendship, fertility, and sexuality.
Ganesa
“Lord of Categories". Hindu. An elephant-headed god, overcomer of obstacles.
Genius
“One Who Gives Birth". Roman. A divine being who is intimately connected with a certain thing — a person, an area, a group of people, etc.
The God
Wiccan. The male principle personified, with attributes such as death, power, and sexuality.
The Goddess
Wiccan. The female principle personified, with attributes such as birth, fertility, and sexuality.
Green Man
Modern Pagan. A personification of the forces of the wild, especially of forests.
Gwouwindä
“Giver of Cows". Proto-Indo-European. A goddess of prosperity.
Hathor
“House of Horus". Egyptian. A very complicated goddess, mixing motherhood, sexuality, fertility, death, and protection. She was often depicted with a cow's head.
Hearth Goddess
Found in many cultures, she is seen as being present on the hearth as the fire itself. The most famous hearth goddesses are the Irish Brighid, Roman Vesta, and Greek Hestia.
Hekate
Greek. Goddess of witchcraft, the crossroads, and justice.
Helios
“Sun". Greek. God of the sun, as the great “eye in the sky", he sees the deeds of men, and is thus a god of justice, truth, and sight.
Hephaestus
Greek. God of smiths and potters, and thus of artisans in general.
Herakles
“Glory of Hera". Greek (in Rome, he was called “Hercules”). Hero god; originally half-human, he knows what it's like to be one of us. Because he had to wander so far in his Twelve Labors, he protects travelers, and also merchants.
Hermes
Greek. Messenger of the gods, leader of the soul to the land of the dead. Also a god of magick, commerce, travel, thieves, and skills.
Herne
“Horn". English. A hunting god; the name is often used by Wiccans as one of the names of their God.
Horus
“Distant (or “Superior”) One". Egyptian. God of the sun, hero god, destroyer of evil.
Inanna
“Lady of the Sky". Sumerian. Goddess of sexuality, life, death, and kingship.
Indra
“Man, Hero". Vedic. Protector, warrior, god of the thunderstorm.
Iris
Greek. Goddess of the rainbow and, in early times, the messenger of the gods.
Isis
“Throne". Egyptian. Mother goddess, sovereignty goddess.
Janus
“Doorway". Roman. God of beginnings and of doors; he was shown with two faces — one looking one way, one looking the other — showing that he was the god of the moment between one thing and another.
Jupiter
“Shining Sky Father". Roman. Head of the gods, and a god of justice.
Kami
Japanese. The term for any spiritual being; it can be used for either the singular or the plural.
Kindreds
The sacred figures seen as a whole, encompassing the deities, the Ancestors, the land spirits, etc.
Kwan Yin
Buddhist. A divine being of mercy and compassion. Also spelled Guan Yin.
Lleu Llaw Gyffes
“Bright One with the Steady Hand". Welsh. Champion god, god of kingship and justice.
Lugh
“Shining", or perhaps “Champion". Irish. God of lightning, kingship, protection, and agriculture. He is called “He of many skills", and is a patron of artisans.
Maat
“Truth, Order". Egyptian. Goddess of justice, not in the legal sense, but in that of doing the right thing. It is by her that the rightness of our actions is determined.
Manannán Mac Lir
Irish. A god of the sea and of wisdom. Mac Lir means “Son of the Sea", which is probably not meant to indicate who his father was, but what he was associated with. His earliest name was probably Oirbsen.
Marduk
Possibly “Bull Calf of the Sun". Babylonian. A god of lordship, protection, and war, he fought against Chaos and created the Cosmos from her body.
Mars
Roman. God of war and agriculture; likely originally one of thunder.
The Maruts
Vedic. A warrior troop that accompanies Indra and may originally have been connected with thunder.
Menot
“Moon, Measurer". Proto-Indo-European. God of the moon, and, because the moon measures out time, of measurement and right thinking.
Mercury
Roman. A go-between — messenger of the gods, protector of merchants (and thus a god of wealth), guide to the land of the dead. Also a god of knowledge.
Minerva
Possibly “Thought". Roman. Goddess of wisdom, communication, and the practical arts; also of politics and protection. Equivalent to the Greek Athena.
Mithra
“Contract". Vedic. God of the human laws, protector from the vagaries of the divine. In later Sanskrit, his name becomes the everyday word for “friend".
Mithras
Roman. The god at the center of a mystery cult that seems to have been based on the idea of the development of the soul into a level of divinity. Not the same god as either Mithra or Mitra.
Mitra
“Contract". Iranian. Enforcer of agreements, god of justice, protector of friendship.
Morpheus
“Shaper, Molder". Greek. God of sleep.
Morrígain
“Nightmare Queen". Irish. Goddess of sovereignty, war, and sexuality.
Nuit
Thelemic. Goddess of the stars, of infinite possibility, and of the great Void.
Odin
“Ecstatic One". Norse. God of war, wisdom, magic, and inspiration.
Oghma
“Writing". Irish. God of writing and thought.
Osiris
Egyptian. God of the land of the dead.
Pan
“Nourisher, Protector". Greek. God of the pastures, that is, of the land between the domesticated and the wild. Bringer of divine madness.
Pele
Hawaiian. Goddess of the volcano.
Perkwúnos
“Striker” or “Oak God". Proto-Indo-European. Protector, warrior, god of the thunderstorm. Patron of farmers.
Persephone
Greek. Goddess of the spring and of new growth, but also the queen of the dead.
Poseidon
Possibly “Lord of Earth". Greek. God of the ocean, earthquakes, and horses.
Püsan
“Protector” or “Nourisher". Vedic. God of merchants and travel; conveyor of brides.
Quirinus
“God of the Assembly". Roman. God of the people as a whole.
Rhiannon
“Great Queen". Welsh. Goddess of sovereignty and of wisdom.
Sarasvati
“Marshy". Hindu. Goddess of speech, eloquence, poetry, the arts, and music.
Selene
“Moon". Greek. Goddess of the moon.
Sequana
Gaulish. Goddess of the river Seine.
Shang Ti
“Celestial Lord". Chinese. The creator god, the divine version of the Emperor. Also spelled “Shangdi".
Silvanus
“Lord of the Forest". Roman. Originally a god of the forest, he came to be seen as also the protector of the land that had been carved out of the forest, and thus of property and those who inhabit it.
Soma
“The Pressed Out". Vedic. Personification of a drink that brought ecstasy; in later Hinduism, god of the moon.
Tahuti
Egyptian. God of writing, magic, and wisdom.
Taranis
“Thunder". Gaulish. God of the thunderstorm.
Terminus
“Border". Roman. God of borders and border stones.
Thor
“Thunder". Norse. Protector, warrior, god of the thunderstorm. Patron of farmers.
Thoth
Egyptian; god of writing, magic, and wisdom. The Greek spelling of “Tahuti".
Thunderbird
American Indian. Spirit/god of the storm, especially of the beginning of the rainy season in desert areas.
Tyr
“Shining". Norse. God of the oath and of war.
Usas
“Rising". Goddess of the dawn, the sister of night. Often spelled “Ushas".
Väc
“Word". Vedic. Goddess of speech.
Varuna
“Encloser". Vedic. Enforcer of the moral order, both social and cosmic.
Vayü
“Wind". Vedic. God of the wind.
Venus
“Desire". Roman. Goddess of love and beauty.
Visnu
Hindu. Creation of the extent of the world, and its sustainer. Often spelled “Vishnu".
Vulcan
Roman. God of smiths and potters, and thus of artisans.
Westyä
“She of the Household". Proto-Indo-European. A hearth goddess.
Woden
“Ecstatic One". Anglo-Saxon. God of wisdom, magic, inspiration, and travel.
Xákwöm Népöt
“Relative of the Waters". Proto-Indo-European. Protector of a well of fiery

water that inspires and enlivens, but that is dangerous to those who aren't worthy to drink from it.

Xáryomen
“God of our People". Proto-Indo-European. God of society, healing, and marriage; of bringing things together happily.
Zeus
“Shining". Greek. Chief of the gods; lord of justice, lightning, and hospitality.

On all who have worshiped here,
Inspiration, power, peace.
On all who revere the Holy Ones,
Inspiration, power, peace.
On who walk the ancient path,
Inspiration, power, peace.

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